White Willow
     Salix alba

White Willow, origional aspirin, great gift to man, contains glucoside salicin, effective painkiller no side effects. Relief of fevers, headaches, sciatic, arthritic aches and pains.Dioscorides, the great first century herbalist is believed to have been the first to recognize the ultimate healing virtue of the willow.  He prescribed willow preparations for pain and inflammation.  From that point on from herbalist to herbalist for centuries, willow was prescribed, as were all of Dioscorides prescriptions. 

Before there was aspirin, there was Willow Bark, which gave exactly the same symptomatic relief without the side effects.

White Willow bark was the first aspirin and was used for the relief of fevers, headaches, sciatic, arthritic, rheumatic and neuralgic aches and pains.

Considered one of nature's greatest gifts to man, White Willow contains glucoside salicin, an effective painkiller.  It took 30 years of fiddling with salicin for the Europeans to produce salicylic acid and then synthesize that down to acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin).  The problems are aspirin causes side effects such as internal bleeding from the stomach walls. 

Today aspirin is a total synthetic and contains no white willow.  Synthetic aspirin taken internally can cause the stomach to hemorrhage.  Approximately 7,000 people die each year from taking the so-called anti-inflammatory like aspirin. 

The above side effect is interesting because Willow itself is useful in all stomach problems especially sour stomach and heartburn.  Other uses for White Willow: it is used as a nerve sedative, for eczema, fevers, inflammation of joints, pain, rheumatism, ulcerations and wounds.

White willow bark tea taken internally can soothe kidney, urethra, and bladder irritations.  Taken internally white willow bark is also a helpful remedy for gout, rheumatism and arthritic pains.  White willow bark is also an excellent gargle for throat and tonsil infections.

White willow bark taken as a tea is a strong antiseptic and an excellent wash for infected wounds, ulcerations, eczema, and all other skin inflammations.  White willow can also be used as eyewash.

To make an infusion place 1 teaspoon of Willow Bark in a cup pour in boiling water let set 10 minutes, drink a mouthful at a time. 

Uses:
Arthritis, Bleeding, Chills, Colds, Corns, Dandruff, Diarrhea, Dysentery, Earache, Eczema, Fevers, Flu, Gout, Hay fever, Headaches, Heartburn, Impotence, Infection, Inflammation (joints), Muscles (sore), Nervousness, Neuralgia, Night Sweats, Ovarian Pain, Pain, Rheumatism, Sex Depressant, Tonsillitis, Ulcerations, Worms, Wounds  

Sources:
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania 1987
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore
Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, by James A. Duke, Pub. CRP Second Edition 2007

 

 

 

Western Botanicals
Bulk Herbs
White Willow bark C.O., cut
White Willow bark C.O., pwd

Herb Extracts
White Willow bark Org

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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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