Rosemary
  Rosmarinus Officinalis

Rosemary as tonic, calms nerves, strengthen nervous system. Rosemary is Analgesic, Anodyne, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-pyretic, Antiseptic, Anti-spasmodic, Aromatic, Astringent, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Nervine, Stimulant, Stomachic.      The ancient Greeks believed that Rosemary could strengthen the memory.   And in Europe they found that it worked in the same area to relieve vision problems, headaches and sharpen the senses.    On this account it became the emblem of fidelity for lovers.    It holds a special position among herbs from the symbolism attached to it.    Not only was it used at weddings, but also at funerals, for decking churches and banqueting halls at festivals, as incense in religious ceremonies, and in magical spells.

At weddings, it was entwined in the wreath worn by the bride, being first dipped into scented water.    Anne of Cleves, we are told, wore such a wreath at her wedding.    A Rosemary branch, richly gilded and tied with silken ribands of all colours, was also presented to wedding guests, as a symbol of love and loyalty.    Together with an orange stuck with cloves it was given as a New Year's gift.

Used as a tonic, Rosemary will calm nerves and bring strength to the nervous system.   Analgesic , Anodyne, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-pyretic, Antiseptic, Anti-spasmodic, Aromatic, Astringent, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Nervine, Stimulant, Stomachic, Tonic.    The herbs diuretic powers explain why it is so effective over Gout, rheumatism, kidney stones, and inability to urinate.

It is employed  externally, as spiritus Rosmarini, in hair lotions, for its odor and effect in stimulating the hair bulbs to renewed activity and preventing premature baldness. An infusion of the dried plant (both leaves and flowers) combined with borax and used when cold, makes one of the best hair washes known. It forms an effectual remedy for the prevention of scurf and dandruff.

A story form 'Heinerman's Encyclopedia of Herbs'.  The famous French herbalist, Maurice Messegue, calls Rosemary  'the miracle herb that restores youth' .  Some time in the 14th century Queen Elizabeth of Hungary fell in love with Rosemary when she was well into her 70's.  She had been crippled with rheumatism and gout for a number of years, but Rosemary gave her back her youth to such an extent that the King of Poland asked her to marry him.

How to make the tonic used by Elizabeth of Hungary:
Lightly crush 2 handfuls of flowering branches of fresh Rosemary
Soak for 10 days in 2 cups of expensive brandy
Repeat the same measurements and instructions with fresh Lavender
Place each in separate bottles with tight fitting lids, store in cool dark place
Shake each bottle twice daily for the 10 days
----------------------
After 10 days decant and store in cool dark place until needed
To mix the 2  together mix 3 parts Rosemary and 1 part Lavender
Take 1 level  teaspoon of this tincture a couple of times daily on an empty stomach

Medicinal Action and Uses
:
The plant contains some tannic acid, together with a resin and a bitter principle and a volatile oil. The chief constituents of the oil are Borneol, bornyl acetate and other esters, a special camphor similar to that possessed by the myrtle, cineol, pinene and camphene. It is colorless, with the odor of Rosemary and a warm camphoraceous taste. The chief adulterants of oil of Rosemary are oil of turpentine and petroleum. Rosemary yields its virtues partly to water and entirely to rectified spirits of wine.

Sources:
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore

The Complete Medicinal Herbal, by Penelope Ody, Published by Dorling Kindersley

 

 

 

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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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