Black Cohosh
  Cimicifuga Racemosa
  Black snake root, Bugbane
  Use the root

American Indian tribes used it internally for snake bites, coughs, chest difficulties, diarrhea and irregular menstruation. Lydia Pinkham created tincture of Black Cohosh for women, 1/3 of the population of America conceived by women using this tincture.  Dr Andrew Weil suggests Black Cohosh over drug therapy for hormone balance. An American herb first used by many Indian tribes such as the Dakotas, Penobscots and the Winnebago's.  They used it internally and externally for such ailments as snake bites (they called it snake root), coughs, chest difficulties, diarrhea and irregular menstruation.

The flowers of Black Cohosh have a strong aroma that make it an effective insect repellent and it is also the reason for its botanical name Cimicifuga which is Latin for insect repellent.

In this country Black Cohosh was made famous by Lydia Pinkham who created a tincture for women in 1876 called 'Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound'.  Black Cohosh was the main ingredient and it is said that 1/3 of the population of America was conceived by women using this tincture 'everyone called it baby in a bottle'.   Lydia became a very famous herbalist in America where she was named 'the savior of her sex'.  Her compound was sold in American drug stores until the 1930's when it was driven off the market by the medical establishment

Dr. Andrew Weil was recently on the Larry King show discussing the use of hormone replacement therapy.  He highly recommended the use of the herb Black Cohosh over drug therapy's like Premarin, which are now being linked to cancer and heart problems.

Black Cohosh works directly on the lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys and the reproductive organs.  Black Cohosh helps with  hot flashes, it contracts the uterus and increases menstruation where it is sluggish. 

Black Cohosh is also an excellent nervine herb and is used in combinations for nervous conditions for both men and women.

Medicinal Uses:
Asthma, Bee Stings, Blood Cleanser, High Blood Pressure, Bronchitis, Childbirth, Diarrhea, Dropsy, Dysmenorrhea, Epilepsy, Estrogen Deficiency, Fevers, Hormone Balancer, Hot Flashes, Hysteria, Insect Bites, Lungs, Malaria, Measles, Menopause, Menstrual Problems, Neuralgia, Poison Antidote, Poisonous Bites Rheumatism, Snake Bites, Sores, Spasms, Spinal Meningitis, Saint Vitus Dance, Tuberculosis, Whooping Cough  

Female Balance Formula:
Wild Yam, Black Cohosh root, Chaste Tree berry, Angelica root, Dong Quai root, Motherwort herb, Licorice root, Cramp Bark, Skullcap herb, Ginger root, Horsetail herb, Damiana leaf, Hops flower, Lobelia herb/seed

Sources: 
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
Nutritional Herbology, by Mark Pedersen, Wendell W. Whitman Company, 1998
Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania 1987
Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., Lotus Press, 1988
Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, by James A. Duke, Pub. CRP Second Edition 2007

 

 

 

Western Botanicals
Bulk Herbs
Black Cohosh root W.C., cut
Black Cohosh root W.C., pwd
Herb Extracts
Black Cohosh root W.C

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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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