Ginger Root
Zingiber officinale

Ginger has been used as a medicine in Asian, Indian, and Arabic herbal traditions since ancient times. In China, for example, ginger has been used to aid digestion and treat stomach upset, diarrhea, and nausea for more than 2,000 years. Since ancient times, ginger has also been used to help treat arthritis, colic, diarrhea, and heart conditions.

Ginger Root is considered one of the top 10 herbs by Master Herbalists.  That little root that you can buy in almost any grocery store has many uses and has great power to heal.

Nausea, Morning Sickness and Motion Sickness
Without the side effects of drugs Ginger Root will stop nausea, morning sickness and motion sickness e.g., car, sea, air.  Ginger Root contains the amino acid Tryptophane, which gives it the ability to be tranquilizing to the central nervous system.

I have used ginger numerous times for nausea when I had cancer.  As the toxins left my body I would take ginger to alleviate any dizziness or nausea.  I usually just cut a piece of ginger root about the size of my thumb and chew out the juice and swallow it then throw out the pulp.  Many times I would mince up the ginger with a knife and make a tea with a small amount of honey, delicious!  Do not use ginger candy it is weak for this purpose.

Other Natural Uses for Ginger
Research conducted at Cornell University Medical College has found that Ginger may help prevent strokes and hardening of the arteries.  This active ingredient in Ginger, Gingerol, is proven effective in preventing recurrences of so-called �little strokes�.  Gingerol inhibits an enzyme that causes cells to clot.

Aspirin has been currently lauded for its blood thinning properties but aspirin has side effects such as causing stomach and intestinal ulcers.  Aspirin and the other similar over counter drugs are responsible for the deaths of over 7000 Americans each year.  Ginger thins the blood and lowers blood cholesterol.   It is known to work to reduce fevers.  It can be used to relieve vomiting and to soothe the stomach and spleen in the process.   Ginger can help to relieve headaches, and aches and pains caused by poisons because of its ability to detoxify.  Ginger Root is a helpful herb for the respiratory system.

Ginger Root is very good at stopping intestinal gas.  Ginger Root lowers serum cholesterol levels.  Ginger Root can kill vaginal trichomonads, (parasitic protozoan) which inhabit the vagina and urethra of women, if used as a douche. 

An easy and effective way to use Ginger Root is to cut off about a � inch slice, mince it, put into a cup add boiling water, let steep for three minutes and drink it as a tea.   

Plague Tonic:
This basic formula goes back to medieval Europe and the plagues.  It is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that will destroy both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.  It is also a potent anti-viral and anti-fungal formula as well as increasing blood circulation to every cell.

Equal Parts of:
Garlic Cloves, Ginger, Horseradish Root, White Onions, and Cayenne Peppers  (the hottest, i.e. Habanero, African Bird, or Scotch Bonnets, etc.).

Combine in a blender with 1/3 unfiltered apple cider vinegar, 2/3 grain alcohol.  Put the blender on high and turn the mixture into a smoothie.  Use some right away if you need to; place the rest into canning jars, keep in cool dark place, shake once a day.

Dosage:
1 ounce, two or more times daily, gargle and swallow.

Sources:
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., Lotus Press, 1988  
Herbally Yours by  Penny C. Royal
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore
The Sam Biser Save Your Life User Manual: By Sam Biser and Dr. Richard Schulze, The University of Natural Healing, Inc.

 

 

 

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Herbal Extracts
Ginger Root

Alfalfa
Angelica Sinensis
Ashwagandha Root
Astragalus
Barberry Root
Barley Grass
Bitter Orange
Black Cohosh
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Boneset
Butchers Broom
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Cayenne
Chlorella
Cornsilk
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Ephedra
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False Unicorn
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Ginger Root
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GymnemaSylvestre
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Poke
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Rhubarb
Rosemary
Saint Johns Wort
Sarsaparilla
Senna
Slippery Elm

Turmeric
Valerian
Wheat Grass
White Willow
Wild Cherry Bark
Wild Yam
Wintergreen

 

Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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