Barberry Root
  Berberis Vulgaris
  AKA. Jaundice Berry, Pepperidge Bush

A liver herb, relieves jaundice and diseases of the liver and gall bladder because it increases the secretion of bile.   In ancient Ayurvedic medicine, Barberry and Turmeric are combined to regulate liver energy a blood purifier.   Contains Berberine an alkaloid that dilates blood vessels, thereby lowering blood pressure.    In its history, this shrub is native to Europe, and naturalized in Asia.  The North Americans Indians used Barberry for treating the liver.  The Indians also found that to drink a prepared decoction from the root bark could restore the body from general debility and improve the appetite.   Physicians found that Barberry relieves jaundice and diseases of the liver and gall bladder because it increases the secretion of bile.  In Egypt, they mixed Barberry with Fennel seed to prevent the plague.  In ancient Ayurvedic medicine, Barberry and Turmeric are combined to regulate liver energy in a way that is very similar to the use of bupleurum in Chinese herbalism.

Barberry contains Berberine an alkaloid that dilates blood vessels, thereby lowering blood pressure.  A tea made from the bark is taken during the spring months as a blood purifier.  Berberine is a strong antiseptic that is also found in Golden Seal.  A strong decoction is employed as an application to sore lips and to heal a sore throat when used as a gargle and mouthwash.  The Berberine in Barberry can also effect respiration where it can reduce bronchial constriction and care for the mucous membranes.

Barberry has astringent properties and also works on the bowel to help control diarrhea, and the herb is said to be an effective purgative.  

Webster declares it of value in jaundice when there is no obstruction of the bile ducts, and in doses short of purgative stimulates the duodenal functions relieving intestinal dyspepsia.  Small doses are also palliative in renal calculi, and in soreness, burning, and other unpleasant sensations of the urinary tract.  

Range:
Europe, temperate Asia, northern Africa, and North America form Nova Scotia to Delaware and Pennsylvania, west to Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri.

Uses:
Anemia, Arthritis, Bladder Blood Cleanser, High Blood Pressure, Blood Purifier, Boils, Breath Odor, Bright’s Disease, Constricted Bronchials, Cholera, Constipation (liver related), Debility, Diarrhea, Digestive Disorders, Dysentery , Dyspepsia, Fevers, Gallbladder, Gallstones, Gum Diseases, Heart, Heartburn, Hemorrhaging, Indigestion, Infections, Itching, Jaundice, Kidneys, Liver Conditions, Migraine Headaches, Mouth Ulcers, Pyorrhea, rheumatism, Ringworm, Skin Disorders, Sore Throat, Spleen, Syphilis, Typhoid Fever

Sources:
Little Herb Encyclopedia, by Jack Ritchason; N.D., Woodland Publishing Incorporated, 1995
Nutritional Herbology, by Mark Pedersen, Wendell W. Whitman Company, 1998
Rodale's Illustrated Encyclopedia of Herbs, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania 1987
The Ultimate Healing System, Course Manual, Copyright 1985, Don Lepore
Planetary Herbology, Michael Tierra, C.A., N.D., Lotus Press, 1988
Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, by James A. Duke, Pub. CRP Second Edition 2007

 

 

 

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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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