Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10, quinone molecule generates energy mitochondria�s working cells heart, liver, kidney. Deficiency include muscle-wasting leading weakness, tendon inflammation, heart failure.  Coenzyme Q10 was first isolated from beef heart in 1957 by Dr. Frederick Crane at the University of Wisconsin.  Its structure was elucidated only a year later.  The name "Coenzyme Q" was chosen because the molecule was proved to be a quinone (a family of molecules essential for generating energy in organisms that consume oxygen).  The 10 comes from the number of isoprene units in the tail of the molecule (2).  Since its discovery over forty years ago, much research has been conducted to determine the role of CoQ10 in human health and disease.  CoQ10 is found in highest concentrations in the mitochondria of the heart, liver, and kidney; organs whose cells are constantly working. 

In 1985, Folkers et al. found that patients with heart failure had a deficiency of CoQ10 in their myocardial cells and that the degree of deficiency correlated with the clinical severity of disease (3).  In 1998, Keith et al. published a study demonstrating increased oxidative stress in patients with congestive heart failure (4).  Since then, it has been postulated that depletion of CoQ10 may contribute to heart failure and that it may be useful in treating cardiac disease.  In fact, it has been proposed that CoQ10 may be beneficial in a number of different disease, including heart failure, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmias, periodontal disease, immune disorders, neurological disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cancers including breast and prostate (5).

Karl Folkers takes the position that the dominant source of CoQ10 in man is biosynthesis. This complex, 17 step process, requiring at least seven vitamins (vitamin B2 - riboflavin, vitamin B3 - niacinamide, vitamin B6, folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin C, and pantothenic acid) and several trace elements, is, by its nature, highly vulnerable. Karl Folkers argues that suboptimal nutrient intake in man is almost universal and that there is subsequent secondary impairment in CoQ10 biosynthesis. This would mean that average or "normal" levels of CoQ10 are really suboptimal and the very low levels observed in advanced disease states represent only the tip of a deficiency "ice berg".

It has been proposed that CoQ10 may be beneficial in a number of different disease, including heart failure, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmias, periodontal disease, immune disorders, neurological disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and cancers including breast and prostate.  Its use is supposedly widespread in Japan and Italy.  Approximately 30 Japanese reports describe the positive effects of CoQ10 on the heart.

CoQ10 shows a moderate variability in its absorption, with some patients attaining good blood levels of CoQ10 on 100 mg per day while others require two or three times this amount to attain the same blood level.  CoQ10 is fat-soluble and absorption is significantly improved when it is chewed with a fat-containing food.

Statin Drug Use and CoQ10
Statin drugs such as Lipitor, Zocor, Meyacor, Pravachol all have a common side effect everyone experiences when used to reduce cholesterol production in your liver.  The process of creating cholesterol in your liver is one part of a process called the Mevalonate Chain.  There are three products created in the chain they are, Cholesterol, Ubiquinone and Dilochol. Ubiquinone or Co-Enzyme Q10 is a critical cellular nutrient biosynthesized in the mitochondria.   Side effects of Co-Q10 deficiency include muscle-wasting leading to weakness and severe back pain, heart failure (the heart is a muscle!), neuropathy and inflammation of the tendons and ligaments, often leading to rupture.  

Other side effects of statin drugs are heart failure, headaches, liver damage, nausea, fever, muscle pain (myopathy), muscle breakdown (rhabdomvolvsis), sexual dysfunction, memory loss, personality changes, irritability, dizziness, cognitive impairment, cancer, pancreatic degeneration, depression.

Reference:
Cholesterol Questions, by Holly McCord, RD, www.prevention.com
Introduction to Coenzyme Q10, By Peter H. Langsjoen, M.D., F.A.C.C
History of Coenzyme Q10, Emily Richardson, MD Student, Crighton University, Department of Pharmacology, U.S.G.

 

Doctors' Research
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Important Note:
The information presented herein by The Natural Path Botanicals is intended for educational purposes only. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent disease. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

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